The Hebden Bridge Lectures

Support Tim Birkhead’s long-term study of Guillemots on Skomer Island

Hebden Bridge Town Hall • The Waterfront Hall • Bar/Café open at 6:30 pm

Lectures start at 7:30 pm sharp – No admission to Lectures after 7:30 pm 

  • Sat
    24
    Nov
    2018

    Chris Renwick is a historian focusing on Britain since the early nineteenth century. His main area of expertise is the relationship between biology, social science, and politics, in particular how the interaction of the three has shaped the way we think about, study, and govern society. His work on these subjects has received international and interdisciplinary recognition.

    This lecture will draw on the themes set out in his recent book Bread for All: The Origins of the Welfare State

    From the pious charity of the medieval hospitals and monasteries through the Elizabethan poor law to the Beveridge report, the Welfare State has had a long journey. Where's it going from here?

  • Sat
    26
    Jan
    2019

    Ghosts – and especially their appearances in art and literature – offer a window on to “the great changes that, over time, have made us see the world in new ways”. The Reformation, the Enlightenment, the age of technology – all have shaped the development of ghosts, and look different when seen through a ghostly lens.

    In the 14th and 15th centuries, ghosts dwelt in purgatory, hovering between heaven and hell, and so were able to warn the living of the dangers of sin at the same time as offering the promise of eventual redemption. This changed with the Reformation, when purgatory was officially abolished by the new Church of England.

    Susan couldn't come on Halloween, so you'll have to bring your own pumpkins, ectoplasm, bells, books, candles etc. NB. No exorcisms before the end of the lecture. 

  • Sat
    02
    Mar
    2019

    Richard Morris, is an English archaeologist and historian who specializes in the study of churchyard and battlefield archaeology. Having been involved in the discipline since the early 1970s, he has worked at a number of British universities, including the University of York, the University of Leeds and the University of Huddersfield, as well as publishing a series of books on the subject of archaeology. He has also held a number of significant positions within the British archaeological community. He was director of the Council for British Archaeology from 1991-1999, and was Commissioner of English Heritage. Having retired in 2015, he currently serves as Professor Emeritus at Huddersfield.

    This lecture will draw on Richard's wide knowledge of British History and Archaeology with a particular focus on the significance of Yorkshire places and people.

    We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time. (TS Eliot)......Until next season. (HB Lit&Sci)